Browse Author

Kreative Car Admin

Save Money When You Buy Your Next Car: Part Two

As a follow up to Part One, I want to make it clear how knowing what you want saves you money when purchasing your next car.

There are basically three reasons why people go to an automobile showroom.  One, they are there solely to look at different models on display.  Two, they are there to gather information, i.e., fact finding, and, three, they have already finished steps one and two and are ready to buy the car, either today or soon.  The trained sales person qualifies potential customers to find out why they are in the showroom, and, since it is this third group of people who are the ones most likely to buy a car, the sales person’s focus is directed exclusively to them.  Customers who are “just looking around” or strictly there to gather information are least likely to get a competitive price from the salesperson because they are not willing, at this time, to commit themselves to purchasing a car today.  The customer who is “looking around”, getting information and asking for prices and not committed to buy, will not get a competitive price: the sales person will quote (and I know this from personal experience as a retired car salesman) an approximate price.  For example, the 2018 Toyota Camry LE is “around” $25,000 plus taxes and fees.  If a customer was not ready to purchase the car that day, some sales people are instructed, by their managers, to not quote prices at all unless the customer disclosed they were ready to buy the car today.  This was the conclusion of Part One:  No customer commitment to purchase equals no competitive price.

Commitment means that the customer tells the salesperson, up front, that they are interested in purchasing a car today; or, that they have already received quotes from other dealers and are ready to buy, now, if your price is competitive.  Note: it is the salesperson’s job to find out what the customer’s time frame is for buying a car, if the customer has not disclosed this.

This brings us to another way in which the customer can save money: get at least three quotes, in writing, from the salesperson at three different dealerships, make sure that each quote has the make, model, trim level desired equipment and/or packages and MSRP of the exact car you are interested in.  By doing this, you are guaranteeing that you get each dealer’s best price on the car that you want.

I also purchased many cars before I became an auto salesperson and for years I didn’t know that this was the best course of action in securing a “good” price, and, as a result, I paid too much for the car.  Being in the car business for many years, I learned that the best way to get the best price from each dealer was to get at least three quotes on the exact car you are interested in.  Many customers purchase from a dealer with the lowest price.  But others, like myself, will compare quotes and purchase the car at the dealer whose price is competitive and whose salesperson I preferred because the salesperson treated me with respect.

In conclusion, saving money when purchasing a car is: (1) a commitment by the customer to purchase the car (2) getting three quotes from three dealers and (3) then deciding which dealership and salesperson you feel the most comfortable with.  If you follow these simple guidelines, you will definitely save money and you will have peace of mind when purchasing your next car.

Remember for your auto parts, please shop online from Amazon.com, Tirerack.com and Vividracing.com.

Thank you.

Kreativecars.com

Save Money When You Buy Your Next Car: Part One

As a former car salesman for over 17 years, I have had a lot of experience with buying and selling cars.  There are many factors involved in determining the actual car you buy, where you buy it, when you purchase it, and at what price you pay for it.

There are two basic vehicle purchase scenarios.  One is the traditional route of going to an automobile dealership and dealing directly with the salesperson and, two, is the more and more popular method of buying “online” and basically, by-passing the salesperson until it is deemed absolutely necessary to visit the showroom.

Let’s follow the traditional route for this article.  Many prospective buyers of this scenario come into the showroom to “look around”, ask a lot of questions, and ask for exact pricing.  At this point in the buying process, this consumer seems to have no idea what they are looking for, whether their selection will be a Toyota, Honda, Chevy, or Ford; whether it might be a used or new car, whether to choose a sedan or SUV, whether they have considered financing type, and when they want to buy the car.

I am mentioning all of this because all salespeople are paid almost entirely by commission, and since they are paid on commission, their income is based primarily on how many units they sell each month.  Sales managers set monthly quotas for each salesperson.  Therefore, a salesperson is entirely focused on the buyers who have a good idea which car they are interested in and who tell you that they are looking to buy a car fairly soon.

A salesperson’s job is to demonstrate one or two vehicles, and they guide the customer into selecting the “right” car for them, based on their needs and budget.  But, the customer should come into the dealership with a fairly good idea as to which vehicle they would like.  The salesperson encourages the customer to take the car for a test drive and points out the features and benefits of the particular model.  Upon return, it is customary to “negotiate” a “fair price” for both the customer and the dealership.

Keep Reading

The Evolution of 4-Cylinder Engines

Four cylinder engines became popular in the 1970s and 1980s, primarily because of several major gasoline shortages.  Prior to that, American manufacturers traditionally offered V6 and V8 engines in their cars as American consumers were accustomed to powerful, gas consuming cars.

It wasn’t  until Toyota and Honda imported “econo boxes” into this country, starting in the 1970s, did American manufacturers realize that they had better change their thinking regarding engine size and fuel economy.  Toyota introduced the Corolla and Camry and Honda countered with their Accord and Civic.  The “sub-compact” Toyotas and Hondas all came with small block, lightweight 4-cylinder engines.

The Toyotas and Hondas were extremely popular, and, within a few years, captured up to 30% of the American auto market.  Their cars were in demand because they offered consumers an alternative from the large, heavy gas guzzling V6 and V8 cars that were the only cars on the market up until this time.  The imported Toyotas, Hondas, and Nissans were very reliable, low maintenance and, because of their small 4-cylinder engines, were much more fuel efficient and they were fun to drive!

Because of the tremendous sales gains of the imported cars in the 70s, 80s, and 90s, GM, Ford and Chrysler revamped their small car line-ups to compete.  Chevrolet introduced the Vega, Citation, Chevette and Cavalier.  Ford came out with the Pinto and the Maverick, while Chrysler offered the Plymouth Valiant.  What do these new American made cars have in common?  One, they were more compact in size and two, they all featured small displacement, more fuel efficient 4-cylinder engines.

Four cylinder engines have become more and more popular.  They are more refined and sophisticated and starting around the late 1990s and early 2000s, every manufacturer featured 4-cylinder engines as standard equipment in their sub-compact and compact models, and some mid-size and luxury models offered 4-cylinder versions as well.

As a result of advanced technology, the 4-cylinder engines in today’s cars are more powerful, are quieter, have higher displacement, more horsepower and torque and, at the same time, have considerably higher EPA fuel economy ratings.

Over the past fifteen or twenty years, Ford, Chevrolet (and GM),  Chrysler, Toyota, Honda, Mazda, Hyundai, Kia and others have developed “state-of-the art” 4-cylinder, turbo-charged engines.

Keep Reading

Observations On Current Auto Exterior Design

Is it just me or have the auto designers gotten together and compared notes regarding auto exterior design?  Have you noticed that many of the major brands have incorporated similar design “cues”?

Design Cue 1:  Sculpted Side Body Panels

Upon close examination, you will notice that every auto brand – as of 2018 – has sculpted side body panels (doors).  Here is an example:

 

Design Cue 2:  Front End Styling

Lexus and Toyota emphasize the “radical” or “far out” front end design.  The 2018 Toyota Camry and Avalon have blacked-out front grills in the shape of a large “shark’s mouth”, giving the car a “mean”, almost menacing effect.  The 2018 Ford Focus, 2019 Hyundai Veloster, 2018 and 2019 Audi A6, 2018 and 2019 Audi A4, 2019 Chevrolet Cruz, and 2018/2019 Honda Accord are a few of the many models that tout this popular styling trend.

 

 

Keep Reading

Car Care

After-market car care products can always prove challenging when first buying your car. Choosing the right products for your car helps in keeping your vehicle in excellent conditions. After purchasing your vehicle, the logical step is getting and using the right tools and chemicals that give it a perfect shine. Car applicators, sponges, car vacs, brushes, dusters, and leather care products keep the interior looking its best.

There is a various advanced level of car care far beyond those old stand-bys. Polishing utilizing a gentle, high lubricity formula that’s easy and safe for all paint types is the best. The latest clear coats can be used on daily basis to remove grime, dust and loose contaminants. You can establish a relationship with a reputable car shop if you are not versed as to what products are right for your vehicle.

Keep Reading

Tesla Roadster 2020

The Tesla Roadster 2020 is the world’s first all-electric premium gaming car, and the 2020 model shows you do not have to be eco-conscious. This high-end,  two-digit performance engine, is the best in its class. This is the second model year of the all-electric two-seater sports car. As part of the 2020 model, adjustments have been made to respond to some feedback from the 2019 model.

If you drive, you reach 227 miles in all-electric mode. As you approach the flush, you can recharge the batteries (which are lithium particles) with a powerful re-interface component. This process can take up to 3.5 hours. This car weighs less than 3,000 pounds. Has a 240p electric motor that pulls the gaming car up to 60mph for 4 seconds and is incredibly quiet in a purely electric state. The Roadster has a smoother look, a less appealing side, and a lighter look. Keep Reading

Automotive: Engine Maintenance

Just like the heart is crucial for the survival of living creatures, so is the engine to moving vehicles. Without it, mobility is impossible. Engines are subject to wear and tear. Again, just like the heart, they are not made to last forever. However, they need taking care of for them to serve you better and for longer periods. Any car’s peak performance and lifespan depend on the engine’s current condition. As such, it is important to do regular engine maintenance to ensure its always working at its best.

To properly look after your car’s engine, you need to keep its fluid requirements fresh and clean. Ensure you change the engine oil frequently before it gets dirty. While Dirty oil may seem harmless and work normally, it drags down the overall engine’s performance which has an effect on its lifespan.

You should also keep your engine from overheating by ensuring the temperatures are within proper limits.

Keep Reading

  • 1
  • 2